Let's talk #CancerConversations

Thursday, July 21, 2016

#CancerConversations campaign Big C

Sometimes talking can be difficult; I'm the first to put my hand up and admit that, but it's important to remember that we're all in the same boat. Our local Norfolk cancer charity called the Big C has created a new campaign to raise awareness and to signpost men diagnosed with cancer to the different services and support available to them in Norfolk. Men - don’t bottle it up, join the conversation @BigCTweets #CancerConversations. For more information go to www.big-c.co.uk/conversations

I imagine everyone's lives have been impacted by cancer in some ways. There is no escaping it. Some more than others. Both my grandfathers died from it. I know peoples parents' died from it at school. I know a family friend's young child died from it. Others are living with it or have to fight it time and time again. Lots of others have been touched by it.
Thankfully, help is out there. Treatments are improving all the time but the BEST thing you can do is to tackle things head on at the first sign of something being wrong. Have that difficult conversation. Tell someone. Seek advice and get the support that is out there. 

Let's have a conversation with ourselves (I'll stick with one)

Question: If you could have a conversation with your 18-year old self, what would you say?
I always find these questions pretty tough. It makes me sad. I don't know what I could say without either casting a dark cloud of doom over my young mind or completely perverting the course of my existence. That sounds rather gloomy but it's true enough. Maybe upping sticks and making tracks while I still had a lifetime of possibility would have been pertinent. Who knows. 
Perhaps to 18 year olds in general I would recommend a few basics:
  • Be guided by your own moral compass
  • Don't let anyone tell you what to do/feel/believe. You're an independent human and your opinion shares the same validity as anyone else's - regardless of their years of life experience
  • Learn what makes you happy. Do it. Keep doing it and share it with others.
  • Accept your body, understand how to take care of yourself and recognise that you will never look this young again - so appreciate it!
  • Make plans but be flexible. It's fine to change your mind.

It must be easier than ever before to reach out to others; whether it's family, friends, support groups or strangers. There are so many ways of receiving support that even if you find it hard to vocalise your thoughts then maybe look online and take things from there. For more information go to www.big-c.co.uk/conversations there is so much information and free support out there.

Donating £3, less than the cost of a pint, can make a difference to #CancerConversations campaign @BigCTweets Text BIGC1 to 70660 to donate

Sophie

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3 comments

  1. Inspired thoughtful blog Sophie , I have a friend who has cancer and had a rough time of it this last year ,he is willing to talk about his treatment and how he is getting on with friends and this is helping him stay positive I'm sure . x

    ReplyDelete
  2. It sounds like a really good thing! Cancer has hit many friends and family this year in my life!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Really good idea here. My Grandad is currently suffering from Alzheimer's, dementia and skin cancer. He is still upbeat and always has a smile on his face though - and is happy to talk about any of it to us.

    http://lizziedailyblog.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

I love to hear your thoughts and I always like to return the favour. Thanks for dropping by x

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Sometimes I am sent items to feature as part of a post and these will be clearly mentioned as part of each post.Everything else is bought by myself. Any sponsored or collaboration posts will be clearly marked. Each post is my own content and all opinions are honest.