When the tide is out at Brancaster beach

Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Brancaster beach in February
On Friday evening an idea popped into my head to make a trip to Brancaster beach one morning that weekend. We decided that Sunday would be most appropriate but sadly the tide timetable revealed that the tide would be high at 5:50am so a walk at the crack of dawn would be more of a paddle. An early dog walk and a detour for a spot of breakfast in hand, we arrived at around 10 or 11am. The beach carpark is a large one, which floods and the numerous puddles bore evidence of either much rainfall or tidal flow. At this point I feel the need to point out that the winter parking charges (we paid £1 for 2 hours) were particularly reasonable especially compared to Holkham's pricing we were gobsmacked about earlier in the month.
Brancaster beach in February
The wind was pretty blowy and from time to time it carried streams of sand along the beach, twirling and dancing as they flowed through the air. I couldn't capture it as I'd hoped.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
A sea urchin shell. I think it was Brancaster where I first saw one.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
Kezzie has talked about collecting sea glass many times on her blog over the years and I must confess I've never seen any. I mentioned this to C as we were heading out and from then on we kept a casual on the sand. It was quite some time later that I spotted a large piece of brow glass which we both dismissed as too big and too recent. After a little more determination I found a piece of what I presume was clear glass. C cleaned it up and pocketed it. I found another three pieces of the same but that was the sum total of our finds.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
The big mussel shells were striking in their shades of purples and blues.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
Prints!
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
This shell looked like a delicately painted piece of art. Hand illustrated. I do like finding pieces to marvel at (and they're everywhere).
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
There were millions of shells littering the beach. So fascinating.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
Looking back at our prints on the sand, mine are on the left.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
The Norfolk landscape is so varied; with beaches, marshes, warrens, open fields, forest, little hills, sandy cliffs, meadows, rivers... the list goes on. I love how immersive it is though, often with no sign of civilisation for as far as the eye can see.
Brancaster beach in February

Brancaster beach in February
I must make more of an effort to return to Brancaster this year, it really is a treasure.
Sophie

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5 comments

  1. I love this post!!! Such beautiful sea shells and the webbed footprints are most intriguing. Very glad to have inspired you to look for sea glass and that you found some! You tend to find more of it on beaches with a shingle but of course, it can still be found.on a sandy one.x

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  2. I love how you've captured the details of the beach here. Brancaster looks like somewhere I need to visit. There's so many beautiful North Norfolk beaches I haven't made it to yet.
    Kate xx

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  3. What a lovely thing to decide to do,you live in such a beautiful part of the World,as your 1st March photo today also shows,so different to the inner City where I often spend my working day and night,this is why your posts are such a therapy,Thankyou for sharing them ☺

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  4. Lovely post, the walk from Brancaster Staith to the beach is one of my favourite walks when visiting Norfolk ,the creaks and Marshes full of birds and the calls of hundreds of Geese this time of year can't recommend it enough .

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  5. Always razor shells marking the high tide line! East lincs coast is one long line of razor shells

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Sometimes I am sent items to feature as part of a post and these will be clearly mentioned as part of each post.Everything else is bought by myself. Any sponsored or collaboration posts will be clearly marked. Each post is my own content and all opinions are honest.