First yield of the year and allotment progress

Monday, May 23, 2016


allotment growing in May
There's no doubt that the weather lately has been good for growing (both plants and weeds) so it's been full steam ahead with efforts at the allotment. The last few weekends have seen us up the plot for plenty of hours getting all the jobs done.
The strawberry patch (about 1/6th of the plot) has just had it's netting put up now that the flowers are blooming, pending the first fruits appearing. I have to admit I'm fizzing with excitement about the first soft fruits of the season. Strawberries are the ultimate in edible joy.
allotment growing in May
I planted out the remaining marigolds, asters and dahlias in the flower bed that C had designated for my plants, behind the raspberries in the fruit plot (our extra half plot). We popped a cage over to stop the rabbits as this plot isn't fenced. Slug bait of course to stop those pesky slugs and snails eating everything...
The asparagus from the plot has been delicious! The first year of a substantial yield, we've eaten some fresh and frozen the rest for soups or to go in a pie. Such curious plants; they erupt with spears so quickly. Quite creepy really when everything else appears to be in slow motion by comparison.
allotment growing in May

allotment growing in May
Of course the maintenance of the plot is predominantly weeding (le sigh) and I consider myself to be Chief of Weed Control and make myself useful with a hoe, pair of gloves and a bucket at every spare moment. I tended the beetroot and turnips (above).
allotment growing in May

allotment growing in May
The last of the blossom has vanished from our fruit trees now, but for the previous couple of weeks there were flowers adorning their little branches, making the whole mini orchard feel very alive. If we are lucky we might get apples, pears, plums, cherries this year. The thought of it is nice though.
allotment growing in May
 Pumpkins, courgettes and leeks have been planted. In the picture below you can see our (weedy) Jerusalem artichoke strip which is only just starting to show signs of life too.
allotment growing in May


allotment growing in May
 I also weeded the carrots and broad bean patch yesterday, but didn't get as far as the overgrown grassy strip. Prioritising is key with keeping an allotment, that's something I learned pretty quickly.
We have three types of corn this year. A babycorn and two regular size sweetcorn which we had to keep apart to avoid cross pollination apparently. Last year some of the sweetcorn had dud corns and it made for unenjoyable eating. Keen not to replicate!
allotment growing in May

allotment growing in May
Above: Fruit trees and soft fruit bushes. Raspberries blackcurrants, white currants and gooseberries.
I've planted lots of bulbs and annuals both from seed direct and grown in the greenhouse. My aim is that there is bountiful colour and flowers between the fruit trees, however, my first year's attempt has been somewhat of a steep learning curve. The flowers I transplanted have been ravaged by bunnies so who knows what will eventually flower, but even so, by the end of Autumn all that will come to an end so I plan to pop in some bedding plants to keep up signs of life and colour.
Below: Celery planted out in troughs, sweetcorn next to it.
allotment growing in May

allotment growing in May

allotment growing in May
 The onions, shallots and garlic rows only got weeded last week but fast forward seven days and they're a state already! I ran out of time to tackle them but it's a job for next time, for sure!
allotment growing in May

allotment growing in May
RHUBARB! We ate a beautiful rhubarb crumble made by C a couple of weeks ago and it looks like we have a bit more still to harvest. Wonderful stuff!
Peas and beans are all caned up. Watch this space!
allotment growing in May
So what do you think? Are you inspired to give growing a go? Taking on an allotment is a lot of work, but don't forget, sometimes a half or quarter plot is an option. You can grow plenty if you have a garden, or you can even pop a couple of garden planters on  patio or a doorstep, or failing that, a plant pot on a windowsill. Where there's a will, there's a way...
Sophie
This post is a PR Collaboration and all content and opinions are my own.

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3 comments

  1. Your allotment looks fantastic well done to both of you ,do not know how you find the time. You can not beat fresh produce especially when it's all your own work, look forward to the next update.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ahrgh, I typed a mahouge comment on my phone and the signal went just as it was trying to save- stupid train line and its black spots!!! Anyway, I
    I'll type it again because I wanted you to do. I am so impressed at yours and Chris' hard work! It is so impressive and you deserve a massive yield! So good!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the idea of growing fruit and veg but as I can hardly keep up with mowing the lawn and watering the hanging baskets I think it's unlikely I'll be planting anything.
    But perhaps I could manage a small container of strawberry plants...
    It's all looking so good, the plot looks massive!

    ReplyDelete

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Sometimes I am sent items to feature as part of a post and these will be clearly mentioned as part of each post.Everything else is bought by myself. Any sponsored or collaboration posts will be clearly marked. Each post is my own content and all opinions are honest.