Watched from the skies

Tuesday, January 09, 2018

The buzzards have become our companions in the skies over the last few years; it's unusual not to either hear or catch sight of one when we're out walking or at the allotment. Of course I've barely captured a single one with my camera, I refuse to use a zoom lens and even when they fly low it's not low enough. See the speck in the very centre of the picture below. Impressive, non?!!
Anyway, I like to hear their piecing shrieks though it's not for the enjoyment of the sound itself, more that I can find myself reassured by the familiarity of recognition. Although my progress is painfully slow, I find that my diagnosis of bird calls is making baby steps of improvement. Listening to whatever breaks the quietness is a pleasant way to use time.
 Monochrome landscapes.


Silver bitches are easily identifiable with their somewhat scruffy appearance; they remind me of a man in need of a proper shave. Wafer thin bark. Apparently it makes for excellent tinder.

 Does gorse ever stop flowering? I'm convinced that I see these yellow beauties all year round.

 Gammy fungus lurking in th dank and damp. Yuck. Although perversely fascinating.




I hope your Tuesday is full of interest.
Take care,
Sophie

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4 comments

  1. I can never differentiate between bird calls. My Dad is brilliant, I often say 'what's that one?' and he'll tell me, then I'll ask 'what's that one then?' and he'll say 'the same as the first one'. Hopeless!
    Have a great week xx

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your mention of using birch bark as tinder took me back 60 years to my scouting days and a little poem from a 1911 American publication called Two Little Savages by Ernest Thompson Seton.
    First a curl of birch bark as dry as it can be
    Then some twigs of soft wood dead from off a tree,
    Last some pine knots to make a kettle foam,
    And there’s a fire to to make you think you’re sitting right at home.

    Lord Baden-Powell reproduced it in Scouting for Boys of which I still have a copy!

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's what it looked like here yesterday

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sorry! Got my date wrong, Seton's book first published 1903 not 1911 (although there was a second edition in 1911) Scouting for Boys came out in 1908

    ReplyDelete

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